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22 Tools and Blogs for the Savvy HR Professional

HR Professional

HR Professional

As an HR professional, you wear many different hats—especially when you are operating within a small business.

Your daily tasks probably include things like managing schedules, resolving disputes, sorting through mountains of resumes, and running interference between management and employees, all while ensuring that your company is a great place to work.

As more Baby Boomers retire and the skills gap increases, finding the right employees and talent is becoming harder and more competitive. HR is no longer a backend operation; it is central to the overall strategy and success of the business.

With so many responsibilities and so little time, we thought we would streamline the process by compiling a list of tools that will make your life as an HR professional easier.

Email Organization Software

First things first: organizing that overflowing inbox. There are tons of great tools to help you get your inbox under control.

  1. Google Inbox: If your business uses Gmail as its primary email system, this tool is a must. It is an email organization system that can be integrated on both your phone and computer so that everything is easily accessible. Watch this video to learn more about what it can do for you.

Price: Free

  1. SimplyFile: If your business uses Outlook as its primary email software, then SimplyFile is the tool for you. It acts as your own personal email filing assistant. Its advanced algorithm learns your filing habits and can file emails automatically after a training period.

Price: Free

Employee Training Courses

Making sure employees are properly trained can be daunting. Standardize the process with some helpful courses that are applicable to professionals in every field.

  1. ProofreadingCamp: Whether your employees are communicating within the office or with suppliers and clients, they must be able to communicate clearly and accurately to avoid causing confusion or seeming unprofessional. The expert editors at Scribendi.com designed the course, so you know that what you are learning is correct and the best quality.

Price: $199

  1. Microsoft Office Training: Make sure everyone is working as efficiently as possible by utilizing the many features of Microsoft Office. This Ultimate Microsoft Office 2016 Training Bundle is a comprehensive guide to Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and Access, sold through Udemy. Udemy also offers in-depth courses for specific software in the Microsoft Office Suite.

Price: $205

Scheduling Software

Depending on the size of your organization or the typical hours your employees work, Excel spreadsheets might not be cutting it. Luckily for you, there is some great scheduling software available.

  1. Setmore: This scheduling tool is great for scheduling employees within a small business. With widgets that you can integrate onto your Facebook page and website, it can also be used for booking appointments.

Price: Free

  1. Sling: Scheduling shift work is a challenge for HR professionals. Sling allows you to craft schedules faster, notifying you of double bookings and time-off requests and allowing you to communicate with employees through the app.

Price: Free

Payroll Software

Make payroll much simpler with a tool that tracks employee hours, benefits, time off, taxes, and more. Not only will a payroll software streamline your processes but it will also ensure your employees get paid on time.

  1. Wagepoint: This payroll software is great for small businesses that need to automate their payroll system. Employees get paid on time, every time.

Price: ($20 + $2/employee)/payroll

  1. Employee Based Systems (EBS) Payroll: This flexible and intuitive system makes payroll easier by helping you manage all the tasks associated with processing payroll.

Price: Custom

Communication

Depending on the structure of your organization, communicating through email might not be cutting it. Whether you are managing independent contractors or remote employees, a more advanced system may need to be put in place. Here are some great options.

  1. Slack: Slack is a communication tool that can be used on your phone or computer. It allows you to organize people into groups, message other users, and send entire files. Slack integrates disparate platforms—from phone to text message to email—into one streamlined tool.

Price: Free (with paid premium plans)

  1. Skype: Although it’s not new, Skype is a tried-and-true video conferencing platform that is especially useful when working with remote employees (think performance reviews, meetings, conferences, etc.). It is also a great tool for conducting long-distance interviews, as many people already have accounts (and if not, they can sign up for free).

Price: Free

Brainstorming and Note Taking

Ever have a great idea that you somehow manage to forget 10 minutes later? These tools help you to preserve your brilliant ideas as you think of them.

  1. Mindly: Trying to organize an event or project? It can be hard to set priorities, goals, and plans. Luckily, the people at Mindly created an easy-to-use mind-mapping tool that enables you to visually organize your thoughts by color and task.

Price: Free

  1. Google Keep: Google Keep is an app that you can also download onto your computer. Jot down notes, ideas, and to-do lists quickly and efficiently. It has several systems of organization and connects with Ask Google for Android users, letting you take notes verbally.

Price: Free

  1. MindMeister: This mind-mapping software helps you create stunning visuals, assign tasks, and collaborate with other employees to create beautiful presentations.

Price: $15/month (business version)

Recruitment

Recruitment can be a long process, especially if your industry has a high turnover rate. Recruitment software can increase your chances of finding the perfect candidate.

  1. iCIMS Recruitment Software: This software has “Hire Expectations” for your company, allowing you to share job openings and find the best candidates more easily.

Price: Custom

  1. Workable: Streamline the recruitment process with Workable. It utilizes job board advertising, social media, sourcing tools, and referrals to find job candidates. It also helps you to schedule interviews, rate interviewees, and share information with your team.

Price: $50/job/month

  1. Zoho Recruit: This tool is great for HR professionals who have to sift through a lot of applicants. It allows you to format resumes, send emails, make calls, manage groups, and post to multiple job boards. You can also customize the layout to your liking.

Price: $25/month

The All-in-One

If your HR department is a one-person operation, as is the case in many small businesses, then it may be worth investing in an all-in-one automated HR solution.

  1. BambooHR: This Human Resources Information System (HRIS) streamlines HR tasks so you can focus on other aspects of your business. It ditches traditional spreadsheets, makes hiring easier, reduces the amount of paperwork you need to do, and has built-in scheduling software.

Price: Custom

  1. SutiHR: This all-inclusive HRIS program manages recruitment, benefits, training, scheduling, payroll, and performance reviews.

Price: $2–$8.50/user/month

  1. EffortlessHR: This HR management system includes an employee portal, a time clock, an applicant tracking system, file storage, and more.

Price: $39/month

HR Blogs

Stay up to date with news, laws, and industry information with the help of these blogs.

  1. The HR Bartender: Need to find information quickly? The HR bartender’s resource list answers many hard questions HR professionals face every day.
  2. Workology: This blog offers HR advice based on your position in a company, from interns to executives.
  3. The HR Daily Advisor: Here, you can find HR news, technology, advice columns, and resources to answer pressing questions you might not have realized you had.

We hope these tools will help you navigate the day-to-day HR activities that are so vital to your organization. Which HR tools do you already use that you can’t live without? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter!

Image source: Nosnibor137/BigStockPhoto.com Incoming keywords: HR professionals, HR tools. HR resources

ProofreadingCamp

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The Ultimate Blogger Guide

Blogger Guide

A desk with writing instruments.

Do you want to become a blogger? Blogging presents a unique opportunity to build a network for your existing customers while also acquiring new business. A blog is the ideal platform on which to showcase your expertise in the industry.

This list of resources is designed to walk you through the blogging process and answer any questions you might have along the way.

Why Start a Blog?

What Is Content Marketing?

How to Create a Content Strategy

How to Write Content

Image source: Alejandro Escamilla/Unsplash.com

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The Ultimate Online Marketing Guide for Small Businesses

A computer displaying online marketing metrics.

A computer displaying online marketing metrics.

This comprehensive list of resources is designed to help small businesses navigate the ever-changing world of online marketing. This online marketing guide will answer your questions about ranking on search engines, increasing conversion rates, and growing your presence on social media. See how much easier your marketing process can be with the help of these articles.

Mastering Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Website Maintenance and Optimization

Image Source: Benjamin Child/Unsplash.com
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42 Ways to Say “Yes” in English

Scrabble letters spelling yes.

Scrabble letters spelling yes.

When someone asks you if you want that second bowl of ice cream, how do you respond? With a resounding “yes!” of course! However, if your professor asks if you studied for the exam, you may respond with a less enthusiastic “absolutely.”

According to Merriam-Webster, the word “yes” is a term that can be used to do the following:

  • Give a positive answer or reply to a question, request, or offer
  • Express agreement with an earlier statement or to say that statement is true
  • Introduce a statement that corrects or disagrees with an earlier negative statement

The word “yes” can be interpreted in so many different ways, depending on your context, tone, and word choice. Let’s explore the many nuances of this word and its synonyms.

Informal

When you’re in informal situations, you will often choose to use casual language. For instance, when speaking to your friends and family, you would probably respond with “yep” rather than the much more formal “indeed.”

Things have gotten even more casual as technology develops. As we communicate through texting and messaging apps, we continue to alter words like “yes” to convey subtly different meanings. Texting has also fostered the creation of short forms and slang. So, when you receive a text from your friend saying, “Hey, do you want me to grab you some tacos?” you can respond with any of the following versions of “yes:”

  1. Yes
  2. Ya
  3. Yep
  4. Yup
  5. YAAAAAS
  6. Totally
  7. Totes
  8. Sure
  9. You bet

However, if your friend asks you to pick up some tacos, and you feel inclined to do so, you can respond with these variations:

  1. OK
  2. K
  3. Okay
  4. Okie dokie
  5. Alright
  6. Alrighty
  7. Sounds good
  8. For sure
  9. Sure thing

Formal

When you find yourself in formal situations, it is important to speak or write using formal language. Typically, you should avoid short forms, abbreviations, and slang.

Should you receive an email from your professor asking whether you are able to come in early to tutor a fellow student, you can respond with any of the following:

  1. Certainly
  2. Definitely
  3. Of course
  4. Gladly

And, if your boss asks if you will be able to make it to the budget meeting, you can use one of these hearty responses:

  1. Indubitably
  2. Absolutely
  3. Indeed
  4. Undoubtedly

Sarcastic

Sometimes, the best way to respond is with a good ol’ sarcastic acceptance. Typically, these are used in informal circumstances when you want to be sassy or funny. Make sure you know your audience before whipping out one of these responses!

Although a truly sarcastic person is capable of making any of the responses in this post sound sarcastic, these ones in particular rely heavily on tone and body language and are commonly used in response to nagging and stupid questions—or to indicate angry acceptance.

  1. Yeah, yeah, yeah
  2. Fine
  3. Affirmative (Because it is so excessively formal, you’ll most likely find this used when someone is trying to sound funny or robotic.)
  4. Very well
  5. Obviously
  6. No (This last one really requires emphasis, and even perhaps an eye roll, to seal the deal.)

Archaic

If you are feeling Shakespearean or just enjoy using archaic language, you can use these words to say “yes.” Unless you are writing a paper about medieval times or emailing an archaic language enthusiast, we don’t recommend using these words in formal writing.

  1. Aye
  2. Forsooth
  3. Yea
  4. Verily
  5. Surely

Sounds and Body Language

You can also express “yes” without words. These are particularly useful when your mouth is full of tacos and ice cream or when you find yourself just agreeing because you weren’t paying attention to the conversation.

  1. Mhmm
  2. Uh-huh
  3. [Nodding]
  4. [Thumbs up] The thumbs up emoji.
  5. [Okay sign] The okay emoji.

Phew! Who knew there were so many ways to say “yes” in English? The word “yes” has been changed over the years in order to adapt to every situation and medium in which it is used. We hope this has helped you to navigate the different ways to say “yes.”

Did we miss any? If you know other ways to say “yes,” share them with us on Facebook!

Image source: Aktim/Pixabay.com

GrammarCamp

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Inklyo’s Top 10 Blog Posts of 2016

A bottle of champagne.

A bottle of champagne.

The year 2017 is almost upon us! As 2016 comes to end, we thought we would take a look at everything that happened this year: Bob Dylan winning the Nobel Prize in Literature, a crazy U.S. election, and a great year of blog content for Inklyo.

In fact, it was hard to narrow our content down to just our top 10 posts. Thankfully, we had your help here. Based on how much our social media followers engaged with our content throughout the year, we’ve compiled a list of our top articles. Did your favorite make the list?

10. The Ultimate Proofreading Checklist

Our student followers found this post particularly helpful during essay season, which is probably why it takes tenth spot on the list. Although it can be tempting to skip the proofreading step after writing an essay, don’t do it! This checklist makes your final proofread quick and thorough.

9. How to Master the Cornell Note-Taking System

We are very excited to see this article in ninth spot. Not only does this system make note-taking more efficient, but it will help you study more effectively at exam time.

8. 6 Things I Learned my First Year as a Professional Editor

This post gives aspiring editors a glance into their future career. There is a learning curve with any new job, but we hope these six tips make it a little easier. Experience is the best teacher, but you can take advantage of the experiences of others to get the same knowledge.

7. 14 Ways to Make a Bad Impression on Your First Day of Work

This blog post is the ultimate what-not-to-do guide for your first day of work. First impressions are important, especially in a new position, so we weren’t surprised to see this post rank on our top blog-post list. We’re hopeful that everyone who read this post is enjoying and thriving in their new position!

6. The Order of Adjectives

Many English speakers don’t realize that there is an official order to use when using multiple adjectives to describe something—they just know what “sounds right.” To English as a second language (ESL) speakers, getting this order down is tricky. Our ESL followers enjoyed this post not only because it is highly informative but also because we used adorable puppies to illustrate the subject.

5. How to Identify Independent and Dependent Clauses

This post proved to be valuable to our followers, taking fifth place on the list. This guide helps you to identify independent and dependent clauses while relating everything back to your favorite drink: coffee.

4. Understanding Verb Moods with 15 Hilarious Tweets

Learning about verb moods can be boring, but these 15 hilarious tweets spiced the subject up! This was a fun post to write, and it’s made even better by the knowledge that our followers liked it enough to push it into fourth position on our list.

3. The Language Sandwich: An Overview of the 9 Parts of Speech

After reading this post, you will feel both informed and hungry. No wonder this article–infographic combo was the third most popular Inklyo blog post! It educates you on a key aspect of grammar—the parts of speech—using a mouth-watering illustration.

2. Becoming an Editor or Proofreader: A Comprehensive Guide

Aspiring editors and proofreaders flocked to this post, which organizes all our editing and proofreading advice in one easy-to-navigate place. It walks you through the steps of becoming an editor or proofreader from training to paycheck, making it no surprise that it was such a hit with our followers and ranked in second place.

1. 20 English Idioms with Surprising Origins

Our official most-popular post of 2016 is both entertaining and informative, explaining some of the most common English idioms. From “riding shotgun” to “biting the bullet” to “hands down,” mysteries that puzzle native English and ESL speakers alike are explained in this post.

We want to thank you all so much for reading and responding to our posts. As much as we enjoyed 2016, we are excited to see what awaits this blog in the New Year. Check out our Facebook and Twitter pages to see more great content in 2017!

Image source: jeanborges/Pixabay.com

GrammarCamp

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How to Write a Job Inquiry Email

The desk of a job seeker drafting a job inquiry email.

The desk of a job seeker drafting a job inquiry email.

What Is a Job Inquiry Email?

After scrolling through seemingly endless lists of jobs on hundreds of job websites, you finally come across a job opening that you know you would  fit perfectly.

So you prepare your resume, tailoring it to the specific position, and craft your cover letter to present your skills and illustrate your experience. At this point, all that’s left to do is to send the email and wait for your interview, right?

These days, most job applications are sent by email or through a job-posting website such as Indeed.com or Monster.com. This means that, in addition to sending your resume and cover letter, you’ve got to write a short job inquiry email introducing yourself and stating that the required documents are attached.

But what do you write in the job inquiry email? Haven’t you already said all you wanted to say in your cover letter?

It may seem like a hassle, but it’s important to put in the effort to make your very first impression the very best it can be. Here’s how.

Writing a Job Inquiry Email

As with most business emails, strive to be clear, polite, and concise in your job inquiry email. Your future employer should be able to understand the purpose of the email in the subject line and in the first sentence. Make it clear who you are and which position you’re applying for.

This is especially useful for employers that are hiring for more than one position, as it helps them to keep all their emails organized. Make it as easy as possible for your potential employer to start you on the right track toward being hired.

When writing the job inquiry email, use formal language and style. Try to match the email, however brief, to the tone of your cover letter, showing consistency in your writing.

It may seem obvious, but it’s also vital to ensure that you attach your resume and cover letter to the email and that you inform the reader the documents are attached. Forgetting to add the attachments or communicate what they are is a costly mistake, as potential employers will likely ignore your job inquiry email altogether.

Also note that you should never just copy and paste your resume or cover letter into the main text of the email. It ruins the formatting and can make your beautifully crafted application documents look sloppy. Save them as PDF files first and then attach them to the email.

After introducing yourself, stating the position you’re applying for, and directing readers to the attached documents, end the email with a polite goodbye and restate your name and contact information.

Here’s an example of a well-crafted job inquiry email. You can use it as a guide when writing your own email to a potential employer.

Hello Mr. Fuller,

My name is Jane Doe, and I am applying for the Marketing Assistant position offered by CompanyXYZ.

I have experience in the field of marketing, having graduated with a degree in digital marketing and worked as social media marketer for the past three years. I know you will see that my qualifications make me an excellent candidate for this position.

I have attached my resume and cover letter, as requested. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe
111 Queen Street
Portville, ON X3X X3X
Canada
(555) 555-5555

Final Steps

Before you get excited and hit “Send,” be sure to reread the email to catch any mistakes you might have missed. Double-check that the correct documents are attached and that you are sending the job inquiry email to the right email address.

Now all that’s left to do is wait for your phone to ring! If you really want to increase your chances in the job hunt, explore Inklyo’s How to Write a Resume course and discover the difference a professional resume can make.

How to Write a Cover Letter

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The Small Business Guide: Tips and Tools for Building Your Business

A small business owner.

A small business owner.

This small business guide is the perfect reference for small business owners who must navigate marketing, accounting, sales, and customer service.

Don’t waste time toggling between tabs when everything you need to know is in one convenient location!

Business Writing Resources

Tools by Department

Efficiency Tips and Tricks

Resume Resources

Image source: Unsplash.com/Pexels.com
Effective Business Communication
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Becoming an Editor or Proofreader: A Comprehensive Guide

Becoming an Editor

Becoming an Editor or Proofreader

As long as there are people writing, there will be a need for editors and proofreaders. However, becoming an editor or proofreader requires patience, skill, and a thorough understanding of what these professions involve.

The following list of resources is designed to answer all your questions about training to become an editor or proofreader and to outline what you can expect as you embark upon an editing or proofreading career. Need more convincing? Check out some of our resources and see what we’re talking about!

Training to Become an Editor or Proofreader

Careers in Editing

Tips and Tricks

EditingCamp

Careers in Proofreading

FAQ

Image source: Lisa Davies/Stocksnap.io
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5 Ways to Support Your Student Through Academic Stress

A stressed-out student.

A stressed-out student.

As a recent university graduate, I keenly remember the dark cloud of exams looming over me. As autumn became winter outside my window, I sat at my book-covered desk with a mammoth and ever-growing to-do list and the prospect of a good night’s sleep shrinking in proportion.

It is during such times of overwhelming academic stress that teens and young adults are most in need of parental support. Following is a list of ways in which parents of students can bring them comfort and provide practical help during exams.

1. Let them vent, and provide sympathy.

Sometimes, the best antidote to academic stress is simply to talk it out. While all their friends are just as entrenched in unfinished work and upcoming exams as they are, students are naturally looking for someone with the time and willingness to listen to their complaints, to commiserate, and to encourage them—someone like you.

Never press them to confide in you, which can cause them more stress if they’d rather not talk just yet, but be a sympathetic ear and a comforting voice should they need it.

2. Direct them to resources.

Knowing where to look for help is half the battle, and sometimes the prospect of seeking that help is too much for already-overworked students. If you notice your student is struggling with a particular subject or is simply unable to deal with the workload, consider researching the school’s academic services, such as a writing center or tutoring service, and gently directing your child toward whichever is suitable.

Alternatively, there are many online resources and books available to help students organize and learn material. This is a practical way in which you can help your student successfully navigate exam stress.

3. Help them prioritize.

As exams approach, students’ heads begin to swirl with due dates, exam schedules, and all the information they have to learn for their classes. Sometimes, just getting it all out of their heads onto paper will do wonders for their stress levels.

Encourage your student to make a list of when things are due and when they should be worked on. Then, help your student determine which tasks are of the highest priority so that he or she will know what to work on first and where to devote the most effort.

4. Remind them to rest.

No one can work 24/7, yet that is what many students feel they need to do to succeed. When I was a student, staying up too late was sure to burn me out and harm the quality of the work I was doing. Students often need help putting things into perspective. Remind them that, although it doesn’t feel like it, this stressful season will pass. In the meantime, they must take care of themselves.

Finding enough time to sleep, eat well, and be active can become yet another stressor to students, and these activities are often the first to be abandoned. Instead of berating students for not taking care of themselves as well as they should, do all you can to make these things easier for them. Send a care package with some healthy snacks for them to munch on while they study, or suggest that they take a half hour each day to simply rest by reading for pleasure, going for a walk, playing a game of catch with a friend, or taking a power nap.

5. Recognize their accomplishments, however small.

A lot of the academic stress students experience is internal, stemming from their own desire to succeed. To avoid adding to that pressure, remove any that might be coming from you by reminding them how proud you are of them and that your love is not dependent upon their grades.

Don’t reserve your praise only for when they ace a big exam; remember to take time to recognize non-academic accomplishments, too, such as helping a fellow student who’s having trouble or eating a healthy meal instead of fast food.

Whatever form your support takes, the main thing is that your child knows that you care and are willing to help however you can. When it comes down to it, exams are something students have to face on their own—you can’t take tests or write papers for them. But you can help them navigate the accompanying stress, worry, and pressure of exams by showing them compassion and kindness and by giving them practical advice.

Image Source: Tim Gouw/Pexels.com

How to Write an Essay in Five Easy Steps

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Back to School Again: Awesome Advice for Adult Learners

An adult learner and his daughter.

An adult learner and his daughter.

Introduction

Let’s begin this post with enthusiastic congratulations! Seriously, going back to school is a great decision. A degree or diploma, whether it’s your first one ever or the first one in a new field, can greatly improve your job prospects and further your career.

As a mature student, you will have a lot of advantages: you have experience in the working world, you have transferable skills, and you have a goal. There are several things you can do to make the most of your education and make the transition back to school a little easier.

Re-entering the World of Academia

The transition back into the world of academia doesn’t have to be hard. A few things may have changed, but as you already know, change is a good thing—that’s why you are seeking it out for yourself.

The biggest change for someone who hasn’t been to school for a few years (or a few decades) is probably in technology. It affects the way teachers teach and the way we learn. It is very likely that your professors will use a system such as Blackboard, an online portal for posting assignments, projects, and class notes. We can’t forget about email, either. Your email account will be your best friend. This is where you will receive notice about school events and where you can correspond with your professors.

As a student, be prepared to spend a lot of time creating assignments on programs such as Microsoft Word and Google Docs. Research will no longer consist of hours spent in the library but, instead, a few clicks on Google. However, you should be vigilant in identifying the quality of your sources and citing them properly.

If you are not familiar with the programs and platforms you’re expected to use, don’t get discouraged; many teachers have experienced the same learning curve, and they are there to help.

If anything, you will find that technology has made things easier, not harder. What you will really need to prepare for is the change school will bring to your everyday life. Pursuing an education takes up a lot your time, and as such, it is important to prepare yourself and your family.

Creating Work–Life Balance

Woman sitting in adult classroom with students in background (selective focus)

Unlike some of your younger classmates, at this stage in your life you likely have many responsibilities outside of school: a spouse, kids, a job, a home, etc. Maintaining a strong work–life balance is key to success.

Be intentional with your time. Classes will inevitably stretch your already busy schedule, so make every minute count. Know that you will have to make some sacrifices, but remember that you don’t have to sacrifice everything. You can also expect your stress level to rise a bit, especially during exam season, so take care of yourself. Get your eight hours of sleep, eat well, and make time for your family and hobbies. It’s easier said than done, but being prepared and sticking to a schedule will help.

Plan your study time. Set a routine, and enforce it from day one. This will help you stay on track. If you have children, sticking to a routine will also help them know that although you need to study sometimes, you will also make time for them.

Study Tips

Making the most of the time you do get to study will help you ensure that schoolwork doesn’t overflow into your other everyday activities.

The first tip is simple: go to class, even when you don’t want to. Being in an environment with your professor and peers will greatly improve your understanding of the material, which is a lot better than trying to teach it to yourself the night before the test.

If you find you have a lot of distractions at home (such as kids, Netflix, or cleaning), consider moving your study space. You can book a study room at your school or use the library. If you learn better in a group, create a study group with your friends from class. This will allow you to hold each other accountable for your study habits.

Side note: Try using the Cornell Note-Taking Method to efficiently categorize all your course information.

Working with Younger Students

First, stop worrying about fitting in. College is all about being yourself, and chances are, there are going to be other mature students in your program.

Although you might encounter the stereotypical “party” student, most of your classmates will be just as dedicated to their studies as you are. Create study groups and join clubs. College is the best time to start networking, so make friends and get to know your peers—including those who are younger than you. You’re all in the same program, after all, so you must have something in common!

When it comes to group projects, seek out people in your program who have similar goals to your own. Remember that you bring a valuable perspective and skill set to the group: you have real-world experience and skills from your previous job. Don’t forget they have skills, too. Share your experiences, and you’ll all see how rewarding it is to learn from each other.

Conclusion

You are opening a new chapter in your life: new skills, new friends, and new experiences. If you are still nervous, contact your school—you’d be surprised how many resources they have to help you. This is an opportunity you won’t regret taking. After all, as you’ll likely hear around campus, you only live once! #YOLO

How to Write an Essay in Five Easy Steps

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