How to Get Proofreader Training

ProofreadingCamp helps you get proofreader training

How to Get Proofreader TrainingNot everyone can afford to go to university. Not everyone wants to devote four years of their life to study. If you aren’t able to complete a degree or if you just don’t want to go to university, there are several options available for getting the proofreader training that will get you a proofreading job.

Community college

Check out your local college for proofreader training courses. While state-run and private universities often have high tuition costs, community college courses can be very affordable. Also, if you need to keep a steady job while you learn, look for evening classes or part-time courses. Your current employer may be willing to give you a day release scheme, where you can have one day a week off work to attend college for proofreader training.

On-the-job training

You may get a job in an editorial department as a clerical assistant and then get the opportunity to train for becoming a proofreader. Take that offer. Although the offer may not come with a pay rise, bite your tongue and appreciate the opportunity. Some companies prefer to promote from within, but they may not be willing to pay for proofreader training courses. Don’t worry too much if your boss decides to save money and train you in-house. The important thing you need is to get that job title on your resume. Also, bear in mind that people who are doing the job day to day are probably just as credible sources for proofreader training as are teachers.

Lean on the personnel department

You can sit and wait for the boss to notice your skills and promote you into a proofreading job via a proofreader training course, but that day might never come. If you have a clerical job, no matter the field of work (it doesn’t have to be publishing), talk to the personnel department of your company. See whether you can put together your own career path within the company, and start that path with a proofreader training course. Companies like motivated, ambitious employees. The personnel department might have an allocated training budget and a list of accepted courses selected employees can take. If it doesn’t have any proofreading training courses on its list, try to convince the staff to add one and to let you attend on a day-release basis. If all else fails, offer to pay for your proofreader training yourself if it’s within your means. This will take them by surprise and add to your promotion prospects.

Online training

If you have to take on the responsibility and cost of paying for your own proofreader training, consider online courses. You don’t have to give up your job to do the course, and you could take sections of your course at your desk during lunch hour or access the course when you get home from work. ProofreadingCamp offers proofreader training as an online course created by Scribendi.com, an online editing and proofreading service. The course has been discounted to $199, so this could be your opportunity to get proofreader training at an affordable price.

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