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Top 6 SEO Audit Tools

Top 6 SEO Audit Tools

SEO audit tools can help you improve your search engine rankings

Top 6 SEO Audit ToolsSearch engine optimization (SEO) is the art of designing a website so that its webpages appear in the first pages of search engine results. The position of a webpage in search engine results pages (SERPs) is called its ranking, and a high ranking is a great way to attract customers to your website. Most search engine users rarely go beyond the first page of search engine results, so it is vital to use SEO audit tools to check and refine your digital marketing strategy. If you don’t have the time to research all the SEO audit tools out there, don’t worry — this roundup has done the work for you.

1) My Site Auditor

You are most likely to become a customer of My Site Auditor if you run an SEO consultancy. This tool produces a report on the SEO qualities of a particular page. Search engine rankings are based on a page’s relevance to a specific search term. That term, when used in a page, is called a keyword. My Site Auditor evaluates a given page for the presence of a specific keyword, and its report presents the results, either through an instantly downloadable PDF or via email. SEO consultants can integrate the My Site Auditor service into their websites to capture the email addresses of enquirers, which allows them to follow up with a sales pitch to any casual visitor who tries the tool on their site. If you sign up for this SEO audit tool, be sure to enter the Coupon Code REFER603946 to get the best deal.

2) Wpromote SEO Audit Tool

Wpromote’s SEO Audit Tool performs a quick comparison between your website and that of your competitor. One of the best features of this SEO audit tool is that it does not limit its comparisons to a given keyword. Instead, it calculates the keywords for which the two sites rank best. This is useful, since it may show you that your site is not hitting the keywords you think it is. The tool is free, and you can use it repeatedly to compare your site to many other sites, one at a time.

3) Screaming Frog SEO Spider

The SEO spider by Screaming Frog is pretty unique among SEO audit tools because you don’t access it through a website. Instead, you access it through a program that you can download onto your computer for free. This SEO audit tool produces an enormous amount of data, which SEO newbies may find overwhelming. The program emulates a “web bot,” which is the program that search engines use to index and score pages. It will take you a while to get to know this SEO audit tool using the free version, which only crawls up to 500 pages. When you are ready to deepen your analysis, removing this limit costs 99 pounds sterling for a one-year subscription, which is quite cheap.

4) UpCity Free SEO Report Card

If you work through each of the recommended sites in this review, you may find the My Site Auditor’s report a little light and the Screaming Frog SEO spider report a little daunting. If that’s the case, try the UpCity SEO Report Card. It falls slap-bang in the middle in terms of complexity. You can access the SEO audit tool using the UpCity website and compare your own site against others, one at a time. You don’t want to swamp yourself with too much information, so tackling your competitors one by one is a useful strategy. Even better, you are not limited to one free try on the SEO audit tool.

5) Web CEO Technical Website Quality Audit

The Web CEO SEO audit tool offers a comprehensive dashboard of features, which are too numerous to list in this review. You have to create an account to access the dashboard, but this “account creation” just involves entering an email address and a password. The dashboard includes an analysis of the social engagement of your site, which covers Facebook, Google+, and Twitter. You can also request a keyword analysis for your site and see the keywords that your competitors use. The SEO audit tool has a comprehensive range of link auditing tools, including a list of broken links on your site. This is a very extensive SEO audit tool, and it is free.

6) Hubspot’s Marketing Grader

For ease of use, the Hubspot Market Grader wins hands down. You might find some of the SEO audit tools listed in this roundup a little too simple, while others might overwhelm you with their complexity. The benefit of the Hubspot SEO audit tool is that it offers two levels of detail. This is a web-based SEO audit tool, and the analysis output initially shows you a summary. However, each reporting point is expandable. This format caters to two types of enquirers: the casual visitor and the detail hound.

Pick an SEO Audit Tool

It will take time to work through each of the six SEO audit tools listed in this article. However, it is worth the effort because, without analyzing your website’s performance, you don’t stand much chance of improving your rankings. Try the free versions of each of these SEO audit tools to figure out which one is best suited to your business needs.

Image source: bloomua/BigStockPhoto.com

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8 Content Distribution Sites You Should Be Using

Content Distribution Sites

Content Distribution Sites We know the Internet is endless. As online marketers, we sometimes feel overwhelmed by the ever-growing networks of cyberspace. Staying ahead of the infinite droves of new competitors in a limitless market can seem like a perpetual game of whack-a-mole.

Among the scores of websites accessible to online consumers, how do you know your content sharing strategies are working? Are you reaching your maximum potential audience?

One of the most effective ways to put your mind at ease and increase traffic to your website is to use content distribution sites. To make things simple, we’ve compiled a list of eight content sharing sites to help your posts, articles, and podcasts reach those most likely to enjoy them.

1. Business2Community

What started as a personal blog in 2010 has become a major business community, sharing high-quality, business-related content to 3 million regular visitors via an open forum. Business2Community has received high rankings from reputable tech and business panels, including AdAge magazine and Technorati.

Pros: Huge audience, professional reputation, opportunity to network with marketers and advertisers who might further extend the reach of your product or content

Cons: Highly sought-after membership—only the best of the best may become contributors

2. Scoop.it

Scoop.it is a content curator, meaning it’s a platform to share existing content on a specific topic of interest and match consumers with the information that matters most to them. This tool allows you to find interesting links related to your business and share them easily, which is a great way to diversify your content feed and show that you have authority on a particular topic.

Pros: User-friendly and automated but fully customizable; free and paid membership options; huge time saver

Cons: No direct sharing of your own content (though you will generate interest from the sites to which you link)

3. BizSugar

The Reddit of the business world, BizSugar allows users to submit content for peer review in the small business community. Posts are added to a virtual bulletin board, where members vote on the content they find most interesting, engaging, or useful. The most popular posts make it to the website’s home page, Twitter feed, and weekly newsletter for maximum visibility.

Pros: Potential to have your content seen by 1 million members of the business community (and thus drive real, usable traffic back to your site)

Cons: Audience limited to those already active in the small business community; success requires some effort (frequent, consistent posting)

4. Medium

Medium hit the blogging world not just as a beautiful platform but also as a place for writers, journalists, and bloggers to get noticed. The site began as an exclusive band of pre-selected writers and, as a result, has earned a reputation as a place to read really, really good articles. Basically, if your content shows up on Medium, readers are pre-conditioned to think it’s a cut above.

Pros: Reputation of excellence, design not marred by paid advertising (an aesthetic plus guaranteed to keep more readers on the page)

Cons: Unclear boundaries and limitations (no identified market or audience); paid or pre-selected contributors are promoted over everyday bloggers

5. Storify

DistributionSimilar to Scoop.it, Storify offers an aesthetically pleasing, easy way to curate social media posts to reach a greater audience. The website is based on the idea that social media makes everyone a potential news reporter—it’s just a matter of having those stories noticed. Storify users have the ability to drag and drop social media posts to create shareable “stories.” Then readers can search the host site for stories related to specific topics, breaking news, or areas of interest. Posts on Storify have even been picked up by news agencies and international media organizations.

Pros: Ability to embed your own content to be shared by other users; a way to diversify content feed while still personalizing each post

Cons: Somewhat limited audience—most users are women aged 25–34

6. Followedapp

Followedapp is a content sharing tool that combines the power of social media with an advanced algorithm to connect readers with the posts they want to see. For you, this means the optimized content you upload will be assessed and recommended to the consumers most likely to enjoy it, rather than to a general (and possibly indifferent) audience. Instead of sharing your content on a separate website, Followedapp allows you to use your established social networks to share relevant content—both your own and other people’s—with your audience.

Pros: Easy to set up and personalize, also great for finding other people’s content to share with your social networks

Cons: Unlike some of the other sites on this list, no free option available

7. Taboola

This is a paid content distribution site that works by displaying a web widget that suggests content users might find interesting. Taboola was originally built to handle videos, so vloggers or online marketers who produce a lot of audio-visual content might find this distribution network particularly effective.

Pros: Best for sharing videos; different pricing options, including a premium option that distributes to the most popular sites on the network

Cons: Difficult to target specific audiences

8. Outbrain

The behemoth of the content distribution world, this paid site is the best known among its competitors, and for good reason. For sponsorship that runs between 25–35 cents, Outbrain displays your content prominently as recommended reading to users browsing popular websites. The distributor upholds strict quality policies, such as not allowing spammy posts that trick readers into clicking on links they aren’t actually interested in, thus protecting the site’s reputation.

Pros: Well-known, solid reputation, affordable pricing, huge network and audience potential

Cons: Limited ability to target specific audiences

Have you used any of the above sites? Did they boost traffic to your site? Visit us on Facebook or Twitter. We’d love to hear your experiences!

 

Image source: flok85/Pixabay.com, sharkman/Pixabay.com

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5 Marketing Tools to Make Your Business Soar

5 Marketing Tools to Make Your Business Soar

Marketing tools to boost your online influence

5 Marketing Tools to Make Your Business SoarThere’s no substitute for a good marketing campaign. After all, it’s what makes your business stand out from the crowd.

A recent survey showed that most companies spend 20 hours on marketing per week. How do you know if you’re using this time wisely? Having the right data is the best way to evaluate your marketing strategies.

Here are five tools that will boost your productivity and effectively measure your online impact.

1) Moz

Moz offers a complete set of tools to synchronize all your marketing campaigns. From traffic stats to social media shares, Moz tracks the data you need to get the right customers.

Moz not only provides top-notch analytics tools but also offers actionable advice on how you can improve your marketing. One of its best-known features is Open Site Explorer, which tracks inbound links to your website. This is essential information for any marketer because it can help you build connections with key influencers.

Ever wondered who’s talking about your business? Moz’s Mentions tool scours RSS feeds and URLs to find out where your brand appears on the web. Moz also features an on-page ranker that helps optimize your content, allowing you to rank higher for a specific keyword.

2) Passpack

Chances are, you use multiple passwords to run your business. Since 2006, Passpack has been making it easy to remember passwords by storing them all in one application.

Once you’ve installed Passpack in your browser, you can securely log in to any website with just a click of a button. The type of data you can save is diverse, from email passwords to log-in credentials for online banking. With Passpack, you can safely share your passwords with anyone in your network, including employees and family members.

Passpack offers different subscription plans to suit your business needs. While its free account allows you to save up to 100 passwords, purchasing a subscription gives you more passwords, shared users, and disposable log-ins.

3) Klout

Klout provides an ideal way to measure your marketing reach and grow your influence. The company has a stellar track record and has run campaigns for some of the most influential brands in the world.

Once you sign up for Klout, you can link your social media profiles, including Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and Instagram. Klout will then give you a “score” based on your social media activity.

Klout digs deep, looking beyond superficial statistics such as your Twitter follower count. It tracks how often users actually pay attention to what you post. For example, your Klout score will increase when you receive comments, retweets, and likes on your content. The built-in reporting tool makes it easy to track your activity on a daily basis, so you can easily tweak your marketing efforts.

4) Raven

Like Moz, Raven combines multiple pieces of software in one easy-to-use package. With dozens of available tools, Raven streamlines the work so you don’t need to spend hours doing marketing research on your own.

Raven focuses on five different categories: social media, content marketing, reporting, PPC, and SEO. One of its most useful tools is the Site Auditor, which crawls your website to figure out which SEO issues need improvement. Raven can also check search engine rankings for keywords, improve backlinks, and monitor your brand on social media.

Raven’s content marketing tools help push your content out quickly across multiple platforms. Using its metrics, you can discover which content is most profitable and keep tabs on the topics that industry leaders are talking about.

5) MailChimp

Smart businesses know the power of email marketing. With MailChimp, you can build your subscriber list and send more great content to the clients who matter most.

If you don’t already have a subscriber list, MailChimp helps you create a sign-up form. Once your list is ready to go, you can begin a new email marketing campaign using the service’s customizable templates. Your emails can be plain text, graphics rich, or pulled from an RSS feed. MailChimp lets you target specific subscribers with your emails so that clients receive only the most relevant information.

After your marketing campaign has launched, you can track it using MailChimp’s analytics tools. Here you’ll learn helpful information, such as how many subscribers actually open your emails. MailChimp can also recommend the best time to send marketing emails based on the activity level of your subscribers.

If you have fewer than 2,000 subscribers, you can use MailChimp for free. However, there are more advanced features, such as automated emails, that are restricted to the paid versions.

Marketing tools put your business on the map

It’s a common refrain in the marketing world that content is king. However, not all content has a built-in audience.

To get the exposure you want, you’ll need to share your message on multiple platforms and connect with the top experts in your industry. Having the right tools is the key to building your online brand and growing your business.

Image source: VLADGRIN/BigStockPhoto.com

 

Disclosure: If there are links to a product in any of the reviews, a commission may be paid to us if you purchase the product. We will never write a review on a manufacturer’s product, nor will we promote a product, if we believe the product will not be beneficial to you.

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Editing Jobs

Editing Jobs

A guide to the different types of editing jobs

Editing JobsJust as there are different types of engineers, doctors, or teachers, there are also different kinds of editors and editing jobs. Typically, when you think about editors, you think about the publishing industry. However, editing jobs can be found in many other fields as well, such as the broadcasting, film, educational, scientific, and medical fields. Editing jobs can be found everywhere! Editors can be generalists who deal with a wide variety of subjects or specialists who deal with very specific subjects. They can work alone or in collaboration with others, such as writers, publishers, or project managers.

Editing is a very rewarding, yet demanding, career. When undertaking editing jobs, you will rely on your innate love of language and reading, attention to detail, overwhelming urge to improve communication, strong organizational skills, and your abilities to work under pressure and meet deadlines.

Types of editing jobs

The following are examples and brief explanations of some of the different kinds of editing jobs that are available.

Editorial assistant: This might be the first editing job that you get in the field of editing. An editorial assistant does what other editors won’t or don’t have time to do and supports the editorial staff. The work includes editing copy, proofreading, checking for accuracy, researching, and liaising with others. The actual amount of editing will vary according to the industry and employer, but this type of position eventually leads to bigger and better editing jobs.

Copy editor: This editing job involves checking text for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, ensuring smooth syntax, and applying style. Copyediting is rules-based and very mechanical. Copy editors are employed by organizations such as newspapers, magazines, publishing companies, public relations firms, and advertising agencies.

Managing editor: A managing editor is a senior member of an editorial team who is in charge of day-to-day operations. This editing job consists of many responsibilities, ranging from making daily decisions that affect the entire editorial team, such as scheduling, adjusting deadlines, and enforcing editorial policies and procedures, to editing content.

Editor-in-chief (or executive editor): This is the top editing job. The role of an editor-in-chief is all-encompassing and includes such responsibilities as setting editorial tone, direction, and policies; strategic planning; budgeting; and representing the employing organization in the public realm. An editor-in-chief is ultimately responsible for the final product put out by the employing organization.

Senior editor: Managing teams of editors is the main task associated with this editing job. A senior editor oversees content creation, ensures that style rules are followed and quality standards are met, sets deadlines, ensures editing is completed in a timely and effective manner, edits, and is responsible for ensuring overall consistency and accuracy.

Technical editor: A technical editor has very specific knowledge and edits very specific documents of a more complex nature, such as clinical protocols and manuals. This editing job necessitates collaborating with researchers and subject matter experts to ensure accuracy.

These are just some of the editing jobs that are available. There are also editing jobs—such as video editor, film editor, photo editor, and sound editor—that require more specific skills. So, if you are interested in becoming an editor, do a bit of research to find out exactly what it takes!

To brush up on your editing skills, check out our online editing training course. This comprehensive online course features interactive exercises and self-tests to help you expand the knowledge you already have, and it may even teach you a trick or two about editing to help you land that coveted editing job.

Image source: Swellphotography/Shutterstock.com

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7 Movies Every Marketer Should Watch

7 Movies Every Marketer Should Watch

7 Movies Every Marketer Should WatchMarketing is an all-pervasive but little-understood sector of the world economy. As with any other aspect of human existence, however, it has not been overlooked by the film industry. Whether you are an eager marketing student or a jaded marketing exec, the cinema can bring you a fresh perspective on the tasks you face in your chosen career. Whether for education, inspiration, or just entertainment, these seven films will help you reassess your approach to marketing.

Every Home Should Have One

This Britcom from 1970 explores the moral dilemmas faced by advertising executives. Teddy Brown, a marketing executive, is tasked with creating an advertising campaign for frozen porridge. Brown decides to use sex to sell his mundane product, which runs him into trouble with moral campaigners, including his wife. The film appeared at the turning point between the Swinging Sixties and the aimless Seventies, and it highlights the care marketers should take in detecting society’s moral compass.

Europe After The Rain

This 1978 documentary focuses on the Dada and Surrealist movements. You will recognize the struggle between original thinkers when creating something new. Another point of interest from these movements is their influence on modern perception, irony, and humor, three crucial aspects regularly used in contemporary advertising. Inspiration and guidance may arise from the most unexpected corners of the counterculture—yesterday’s avant-garde is today’s mainstream.

The Ad and the Ego

This film takes a scholarly approach toward advertising, marketing, consumerism, and globalization. After a rundown of the evolution of advertising, invited academics expound on the interaction among the advertising industry, society, culture, and product development. The movie highlights the resistance of the general public toward being sold something. This explains why counterculture concepts were co-opted by marketers to blindside the resistant consumer.

The Joneses

This gently comedic drama centers on an ideal family following a move to a suburban house. The members of the family soon inspire friends and neighbors to copy their purchases and pursuits before the much-admired Joneses are revealed to be a localized marketing campaign. The movie applies the marketing concept of celebrity endorsements to average neighbors.

Jobs

No one in the current era has had as much as success in the design-to-sale process as Steve Jobs. This film is a biography of the recently deceased genius and follows his departure from and eventual return to Apple.

Winnebago Man

An artless promotional video by a Winnebago salesman goes viral on the Internet, making him a success. This is a true story and an early example of how content marketing can promote products for free.

Glengarry Glen Ross

A real estate agency owner pits his sales team against one another by creating a competition on sales turnover—the first and second place earn a prize, the third-place salesman gets the sack. Is this a winning formula for goal setting? Probably not. But you knew we had to include it here!

Image source: Javier Brosch/BigStockPhoto.com

Inklyo's free ebook about business blogging.

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How to Get Proofreader Training

How to Get Proofreader Training

ProofreadingCamp helps you get proofreader training

How to Get Proofreader TrainingNot everyone can afford to go to university. Not everyone wants to devote four years of their life to study. If you aren’t able to complete a degree or if you just don’t want to go to university, there are several options available for getting the proofreader training that will get you a proofreading job.

Community college

Check out your local college for proofreader training courses. While state-run and private universities often have high tuition costs, community college courses can be very affordable. Also, if you need to keep a steady job while you learn, look for evening classes or part-time courses. Your current employer may be willing to give you a day release scheme, where you can have one day a week off work to attend college for proofreader training.

On-the-job training

You may get a job in an editorial department as a clerical assistant and then get the opportunity to train for becoming a proofreader. Take that offer. Although the offer may not come with a pay rise, bite your tongue and appreciate the opportunity. Some companies prefer to promote from within, but they may not be willing to pay for proofreader training courses. Don’t worry too much if your boss decides to save money and train you in-house. The important thing you need is to get that job title on your resume. Also, bear in mind that people who are doing the job day to day are probably just as credible sources for proofreader training as are teachers.

Lean on the personnel department

You can sit and wait for the boss to notice your skills and promote you into a proofreading job via a proofreader training course, but that day might never come. If you have a clerical job, no matter the field of work (it doesn’t have to be publishing), talk to the personnel department of your company. See whether you can put together your own career path within the company, and start that path with a proofreader training course. Companies like motivated, ambitious employees. The personnel department might have an allocated training budget and a list of accepted courses selected employees can take. If it doesn’t have any proofreading training courses on its list, try to convince the staff to add one and to let you attend on a day-release basis. If all else fails, offer to pay for your proofreader training yourself if it’s within your means. This will take them by surprise and add to your promotion prospects.

Online training

If you have to take on the responsibility and cost of paying for your own proofreader training, consider online courses. You don’t have to give up your job to do the course, and you could take sections of your course at your desk during lunch hour or access the course when you get home from work. ProofreadingCamp offers proofreader training as an online course created by Scribendi.com, an online editing and proofreading service. The course has been discounted to $199, so this could be your opportunity to get proofreader training at an affordable price.

Image source: DusanVulic/Shutterstock.com

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3 Proofreading Exercises to Help You Hone Your Skills

Proofreading Exercises

Introduction

Proofreading ExercisesTaking your work from inception to publishable product requires that you perform a series of detail-oriented tasks. One of the final tasks in this process is that of proofreading. Because it is easy to miss errors in one’s own writing, experienced editors and proofreaders can help you polish your words and ideas to make sure you produce the best possible version of your work. However, being able to review a document for clarity and grammatical accuracy is a good skill to have, as it enables you to proofread as you write, review other people’s writing, and even work as a proofreader on a freelance basis.

To do any of this, however, you must first understand the differences between editing and proofreading. Editing involves an in-depth review of written work. It requires looking not only for grammatical mistakes but also for issues like inconsistency in style, voice, plot, and characterization. Because the editor must keep all these complex matters in mind, smaller inconsistencies and errors may remain even after the document has been reviewed.

That’s where proofreading comes in. Good proofreaders are detail-oriented individuals who know their grammar rules inside and out and are able to spot mistakes. Without having to worry about things like style and voice, a proofreader can focus on the mechanical aspects of writing, making sure that each word and sentence is correct.

Proofreading Exercises

Being able to successfully proofread often means you’re the type of person who spots every spelling mistake, comma splice, or formatting inconsistency. Do you think you have what it takes? If so, spot the common proofreading errors in the following three proofreading exercises to practice your skills and become a better proofreader!

Feel free to paste the text into a document editor (such as Microsoft Word) so that you can keep track of your changes. Once you’ve gone through each exercise, check your changes against the answer key below. If you want more advanced proofreading training, consider our proofreading course.

Proofreading Exercise 1:

In Greek mythology Zeus, an Olympian god, was known as the immortal ruler of both gods and men. Zeus was the son of the titans Cronos and Rhea and presided over his 5 brothers and sisters who ruled various aspect of the heavenly and earthly worlds. He was married to his sister Heera, with whom he had three children: Ares—the god of war, Hephaistos—the god of metalworking, and Hebe—the goddess of youth. Hera was often the jealous wife, and unhappy with Zeus’s many affairs with other goddesses, nymphs and mortal woman. As a result of these affairs, many ancient greek heroes and rulers were produced, such as Perseus, Hercules, and even the famous Helen of Troy. As a god, Zeus ruled over the most important aspects of nature and human society, and he controlled the laws and fates of men as well as the sky and whether. He is often called by the epithets “The Thunderer” or “Gatherer of Clouds” in the Homeric poems, his control of such natural forces were represented by his weapons and armor: Zeus was able to fight with both thunder and lightning, and the shaking of his aegis (his shield) could create terrible storms.

Proofreading Exercise 2:

Moose related deaths are on the rise in Canada. As highways expand and encroach on the habitat of Canadian wildlife, vehicle collisions with these animals are becoming more commonplace, especially in provinces, such as British Colombia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland and labrador. According to Wildlifecollisions.ca, in 2014 there were four to 8 large animal vehicle collisions and hour within Canada. A large number of these collisions involve moose and deer species, so much so, that a class-action lawsuit was brought against Newfoundland’s Provincial Government for not controlling the explosive moose population in that province. In situations where average highway speeds are 100 km/hour and the average moose weighs 700 kg, collisions can be fatal for both the animal and the vehicle occupants. These types of incidents will continue to increase on the Canadian island as human populations expand alongside the moose, which is considered an invasive species on the island and has no natural predators.

Proofreading Exercise 3:

The past decade has witnessed the rise in popularity of the fictional monster known as the zombie. From movies and TV shows to iPhone apps and bestselling novels, the zombie has permeated popular culture. What if a zombie plague was possible? Surprisingly, there are quite a few scientists who have taken a serious look at the causes and probability of a zombie pandemic occurring in the real world. They have broken down the common symptoms of zombie virus sufferers to determine what might actually be going on in those half-eaten brains. The most common symptom of the zombie illness is the lumbering gait, which indicates a loss of coordination and neurological damage. This may go hand-in-hand with the classic loss of intelligence and penchant for moaning. Second, the insatiable zombie appetite for other humans could be associated with lost hyptothalamic functioning. Zombies’ rage; one-track minds; and inability to remember loved ones are all symptoms of severe brain damage as well, with different areas of the brain being effected. So, what should you do if your ever face-to-face with a zombie? Much like with T-Rex in Jurassic Park, do not run and find somewhere to hide. Zombie’s suffer from something like Bálint’s syndrome, which causes the sufferer to only see whatever requires the most attention.

Answer KeyProofreading Exercises

Now let’s see how you did! You can compare your changes to the revised passages below, or you can download the full answer key here. to have each change highlighted and explained.

Proofreading Exercise 1 Key:

In Greek mythology, Zeus, an Olympian god, was known as the immortal ruler of both gods and men. Zeus was the son of the titans Cronus and Rhea and presided over his five brothers and sisters, who ruled various aspects of the heavenly and earthly worlds. He was married to his sister Hera, with whom he had three children: Ares—the god of war, Hephaistos—the god of metalworking, and Hebe—the goddess of youth. Hera was often the jealous wife and unhappy with Zeus’ many affairs with other goddesses, nymphs, and mortal women. As a result of these affairs, many ancient Greek heroes and rulers were produced, such as Perseus, Hercules, and even the famous Helen of Troy. As a god, Zeus ruled over the most important aspects of nature and human society, and he controlled the laws and fates of men as well as the sky and weather. He is often called by the epithets “The Thunderer” or “Gatherer of Clouds” in the Homeric poems, and his control of such natural forces was represented by his weapons and armor: Zeus was able to fight with both thunder and lightning, and the shaking of his aegis (his shield) could create terrible storms.

Proofreading Exercise 2 Key:

Moose-related deaths are on the rise in Canada. As highways expand and encroach on the habitats of Canadian wildlife, vehicle collisions with Canadian wildlife are becoming more commonplace, especially in provinces such as British Columbia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland and Labrador. According to Wildlifecollisions.ca (2014), in 2014 there were four to eight large animal vehicle collisions an hour within Canada. A large number of these collisions involve moose and deer species, so much so that a class-action lawsuit was brought against Newfoundland’s provincial government for not controlling the explosive moose population in that province. In situations where average highway speeds are 100 km/hour and the average moose weighs 700 kg, collisions can be fatal for both the animal and the vehicle occupants. These types of incidents will continue to increase on the Canadian island as human populations expand alongside the moose, which is considered an invasive species on the island and has no natural predators.

Proofreading Exercise 3 Key:

The past decade has witnessed the rise in popularity of the fictional monster known as the zombie. From movies and TV shows to iPhone apps and bestselling novels, the zombie has permeated popular culture. What if a zombie plague was possible? Surprisingly, there are quite a few scientists who have taken a serious look at the causes and probability of a zombie pandemic occurring in the real world. They have broken down the common symptoms of zombie-virus sufferers to determine what might actually be going on in those half-eaten brains. First, the most common symptom of the zombie illness is the lumbering gait, which indicates a loss of coordination and neurological damage. This may go hand-in-hand with the classic loss of intelligence and penchant for moaning. Second, the insatiable zombie appetite for other humans could be associated with lost hypothalamic functioning. Zombies’ rage, one-track minds, and inability to remember loved ones are all symptoms of severe brain damage as well, with different areas of the brain being affected. So, what should you do if you’re ever face-to-face with a zombie? Much like with T-Rex in Jurassic Park, do not run and find somewhere to hide. Zombies suffer from something like Bálint’s syndrome, which causes the sufferer to only see whatever requires the most attention.

Did you catch all the mistakes in these proofreading exercises?

Image sources: markusspiske/Pixabay.com, skeeze/Pixabay.com

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10 Useful Sites All Marketers Should Save to Their Favorites Bars

10 Useful Sites All Marketers Need in Their Favorites Bars

10 Useful Sites All Marketers Need in Their Favorites Bars

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If you’re a marketer who often finds yourself overwhelmed by the sheer volume of marketing resources available online, rest assured that you’re not alone. There are many useful sites and apps out there, but that doesn’t mean that all of them are right for you. Each marketing expert must determine which marketing resources and sites best suit his or her needs. I’ve been accumulating my own list of resources over the last little while, each of which occupies its own comfy spot in my Favorites bar. These useful sites might not all be right for you, but I’m sure that some of the items on my list will end up occupying your Favorites bar as well—that is, if they aren’t already there.

1. Hootsuite

Hootsuite is a site used for scheduling and managing social media posts and metrics across different platforms. Hootsuite can be used for over 35 popular social networks, including popular sites like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Not only does Hootsuite allow you to schedule posts, it also gives you information about who is reading, liking, and sharing those posts. I could go on forever about all the advantages of using Hootsuite for keeping your social media strategy on track, or you could go ahead and try it yourself.

2. Google Analytics

Marketing experts worth their salt understand the importance of tracking and measuring their efforts. What’s the point of organizing and following through with campaigns if you don’t know how well—if at all—those campaigns are working to improve your conversion rates? Google Analytics is one of the best marketing resources for keeping track of your progress, and it will ultimately help you improve your marketing strategy. Like the other useful sites listed in this post, Google Analytics is free to use.

 3. URL Builder

Though URL Builder is part of Google Analytics, I have this site saved as its own page in my Favorites bar. I regularly depend on this useful site to create custom URLs that enable me to track the activity of my site’s visitors. While some of the other sites in my Favorites bar are reference sites with information to which I often refer, URL Builder has a practical application that I use often. Creating and distributing great content is all well and good, but if you can’t keep track of how that content is helping your site improve, your job isn’t being done in its entirety.

4. Canva

People who work in marketing must wear multiple figurative hats. We sometimes fill several roles, including writer, researcher, manager, and even graphic designer. This last point is where Canva comes in handy. One of the better-organized graphic design sites out there, this useful site allows marketers to create custom presentations, flyers, and other graphic images. Its fun, fresh, and simple modern design allows even amateur designers to create professional-looking pieces. With free access to sites like Canva, marketers for even the smallest companies no longer have any excuse for not creating beautiful, professional content.

5. StockSnap.io

In case you haven’t heard, corny stock photos are out. Gone are the days of businesspeople smiling back-to-back with their arms crossed across their chests. Instead, websites are now making use of real photographs of nature and of normal people in everyday situations. There are a few useful sites for finding copyright-free photographs, but StockSnap offers a particularly beautiful collection of images for you to use in your marketing efforts.

6. HubSpot’s Marketing Blog

Content marketing is a fairly new phenomenon. If you’re looking for a credible source of diverse information regarding the glamourous field of content marketing, look no further than the HubSpot Marketing Blog. It’s one of those marketing resources that I rely on much more than I sometimes think I should. Some of the posts cover general topics like the psychology of marketing, while others are detailed accounts of specific topics like buyer personas. Whatever you need to know about marketing, you can probably find it on HubSpot.

7. Pocket

Ever come across an article, video, or other piece of content that you thought would be great for your blog or social media, but that you didn’t have time to look at? With Pocket, you can save all such content in one place, then look at it later. You can download Pocket on your phone, tablet, or computer, and once you’ve saved something to Pocket, you don’t need Internet access to look at that content again. Pocket is a great app for keeping track of useful sites and marketing resources, and it can help you stay organized.

8. Scoop.it

This content curation site is useful not just for distributing your own content, but for finding other great marketing resources and useful content to share with your followers. Scoop.it users add their own content to the site, along with a description, allowing other people to view that content according to topic. It’s basically just one big platform for sharing things, and—as we all know—sharing is caring. Especially in the world of marketing.

9. Piktochart

If you think infographics are super cool, but you haven’t the foggiest idea how to create one of your own, have no fear—Piktochart is here. This site allows you to make professional infographics quickly and easily. Infographics can be great forms of visually interesting content; if you don’t have any for your site yet, I recommend that you check out this cool marketing resource. Did I mention that it’s free?

10. Google Drive

While not strictly a marketing resource, Google Drive can be a content marketing team’s best friend. If you’re working with a team of people, this large online storage space can help you share files and collaborate without having to deal with the hassle of over-sized email attachments. Google Drive also allows you to work on the same content from different computers, tablets, and even smartphones. If you want to have access to your work wherever you go, or if you’d like other people to have access to it, Google Drive might be the site for you.

Conclusion

The age of content marketing is here, and with it, an abundance of resources for marketers like you and me. If you make use of some of the resources above, you’ll surely have an easier time navigating the competitive and complex world of content marketing. You might even have a bit of fun along the way.